Wynni Penny Pie (or on this blog Pynni)

This post has been much harder to write than I thought it was going to be. For some reason, talking about Chi and any struggles we’ve had felt natural. I felt like talking about it helped me and may, in turn, help someone else. I’m struggling to view Pynni in this light.

For some reason, learning disorders feel so much more personal. It feels like it can change how people view you, how they treat you, how you view yourself.

Pynni made a comment to me the other day that hurt me to the core. She was skipping away from her school day and whirled around and smiled broadly at me and said, “I’m getting smarter and smarter!”

I said, “Babe, you’ve always been smart. You are learning more and more things.”

I said, “Reading has been hard for you, but that doesn’t make you not smart.”

She says, “Really?”

Oof. I thought I’d been pretty clear on how smart I thought she was, but SHE doesn’t view herself like that. I don’t want ANYONE to think she is any less smart than their over-achieving early readers because my sweet Wynni struggles in that area.

So there it is. Maybe, I’m the one with the issues. Reading was always very easy for me. I was one of those over-achieving early readers. I was like my oldest: big vocabulary, advanced reading level. Maybe, I’ve unknowingly judged people who didn’t read well and found them less smart than I. That’s changing right now.

Pynni was diagnosed with “Severe written language disorder” by the Speech Language Pathologist that Pieces sees for his speech therapy (I’ll call her SLP here). SWLD is characterized by difficulty sounding out phonemic words, letter reversals, omission and addition of phonemes, as well as, global errors, such as, reading words that are similar yet different (i.e. goes/gets, tale/tall, when/what). ¬†SLP also noted that Pynni also demonstrated difficulty in the area of phonemic awareness in her attempts to sound out phonemic words. Such tasks often took greater than 10 seconds at which point the word was provided to her. She lacked confidence when decoding phonemic words and tended to guess a word if she did not recognize it, even after an attempt to decode it. Her fluency rate is negatively affecting her comprehension. She shows mild deficit in the area of phonemic awareness skills for encoding.

SLP noted that when Pynni was provided the word, she applied that knowledge to every recurrence of the word in the rest of the reading. Which is, apparently, not something many kids do when they are struggling with written language like she is.

There may be other components to this, and I’m prepared to find that there are other issues at play. Right now, though, this therapy is going to start addressing a large chunk of the issues Pynni has exhibited while reading.

We’ve only had two therapy sessions and a little bit of work to do at home, but I can see little bits of that natural self-confidence she has peaking out while she goes about her school work. There’s a lot of work do, yet, but little bits at a time seems to be what she needs.

 

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