I read. Most people who know me know this fundamental fact. My favorite kinds of books are pretty frivolous. I like high fantasy. I like romances. I like paranormal just about anything so long as it’s well written. I like novels of the just plain ‘ole variety. I really prefer books that are tomes of monstrousness with epic prose and lots of detail. I like books written with amazing collections of words. I like to read books that I consume and wish I could have written that.

I have a few most favoritest authors. Topping my top 5 is Joshilyn Jackson. She doesn’t write romances or fantasy. Her books are not long, but they are thick with amazing imagery and layered with meaning and general awesomeness. Well, a good friend of hers wrote a book and I’m all over this thing.

See, Joshilyn Jackson isn’t only good with words. She is good at reading them for her audio books and she had performed the reading of her friend, Lydia Netzer’s, Shine Shine Shine. I’ve said it before, but I’ll reiterate. Joshilyn Jackson could read the phone book and it would be the most amazing thing you’d ever put in your ears. That is no lie.

So. Shine Shine Shine. It’s about love and family, what it means to be human, and about murder and robots. You should read it. In an interview Ms. Netzer was asked who she imagines reading this book. Her response was:

“[…]I imagine a mom reading this book in a stolen hour while she’s waiting for the kids at karate class. Maybe she’s sitting in her car with the book in her lap, feeling like crap because she forgot to pack a healthy snack for dance camp and had to buy a Lunchable instead, or because the dog barfed on the baseball pants and possible she’s the only one that can see the outline of the barf stain but she knows it’s there.

At some point in reading SHINE SHINE SHINE I hope she closes the book for a minute and says to herself, You know what, forget this elusive “Perfect Mom” measuring stick, and forget this comparing myself to everyone else. I’m a kick-ass mom, I own this job, and my kids are awesome.

I imagine a man reading this book on some high-tech device, who could get some satisfaction and encouragement from the fact that other people see human relationships as engineering problems, and don’t cry when people die, and count simple declarative sentences as poetry, and memorize what to say to their children.
I’d like that man to know that a scripted response counts as heartfelt, and that you can be a great dad and husband and still never really know what to say, or how to say it. I don’t know if this book will ever find that guy, but maybe it’ll find someone who knows him.” (you can find the interview here.)

Pretty powerful, I say. If you’d like to know more about the author go to Lydia’s blog. She wrote an insanely good post about marriage that I think everyone should check out. Now. Don’t you wanna read her book?

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