Category: Crocheting


The costuming has been going much slower since the first big push with Pynni’s Weeping Angel dress. Last week, I was able to eek out some time to work on the wig. This was surprising because I was keeping Abshie and Timmus while my brother and his wife were out of town, and they are public school attendees. So here I was, thinking that I would be too busy with my normal schedule plus morning and afternoon carpool topped with homework and extra baths.

All my time concerns were for naught, though, and we were able to keep a tight schedule that allowed for the PS kids to have playtime with the HS kids, and THAT gave me time to work on the wig.

I started out crocheting a beanie with a flap around the ears and back of the head to better mimic Pynni’s natural hair line. Then I created bundles of yarn about 18 to 20 inches long that I tied along the center line of the beanie every two rows or so. This created the center part.

I looped yarn “latch hook” style (a’la amigurumi hair) all along the front, inside edge of the beanie ┬áso that when I pulled the yarn up into the twist, there would be no beanie parts showing. Next I created two, much fatter bundles of yarn of similar length to the attached bundles and braided each of them. One of those braids, I rolled into a disc to attach to the back of the beanie to be the base of the messy bun. The other braid, I glued along the small space between the first bundle of yarn in the front and the amigurumi hairline. The Weeping Angels have some sort of ribbon wrapped around their heads and through their hair, and I thought this would fit the bill while also filling in gaps and covering exposed beanie.

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I wrapped a styro head with plastic wrap and worked the, now, yarn covered beanie onto it. I couldn’t decide, up until actually getting into the nitty gritty of this part of the project, what I was going to use to secure the yarn down on the wig. Originally, I thought I’d use fabric glue, but that is made to be flexible. I was wanting stiff because this is supposed to be statue-like. So I thought I would use Elmer’s glue. This would dry clear and stiff and, maybe watered down a little, would make a good over-all treatment to make the whole thing stiff. When I started gluing, the Elmer’s glue was a failure. It didn’t dry fast enough to be of use for securing large sections of the wig, so I had to try something else.

I settled on my glue gun and got to work. This worked exactly as I’d hoped, if a little more painfully. Did you know that glue gun glue is HOT? Yeah, me, too, but I burned my poor fingers over and over because yarn hair isn’t very solid and glue oozes easily into the spaces. I tried using tools like popsicle sticks to maneuver the hair around in the glue, but they just stuck to the glue. Whatever. It got done sans a few fingerprints.

Not really, no fingers were permanently damaged in the making of this costume (disclaimer: yet).

I glued down the braided disk and the head band type braid and then, beginning on the left hand side facing me, I began twisting the “hair” along the hairline toward the back and wrapped the “hair” around the braided disc. Along the way, I glued and secured the “hair”, leaving some of it down to create curls along the hairline after the main part of the wig was done. I, then, worked on the right side facing me and repeated the process, making sure the hair was a symmetrical as I could make it.

Then I trimmed the remaining “hair” and wound it into “curls” and glued and pinned them into place. I discovered that Elmer’s glue had it’s uses. In the end, there were ends of yarn that didn’t want to lay flat and weren’t long enough to tuck in anywhere hidden, so I used Elmer’s to glue the ends down and pins to hold them in place while the glue dried.

I also decided to forgo the stiffening of the entire wig. I’m not making the dress stiff so why would I do that to the wig? It doesn’t flow around her shoulders or anything. All the tresses are glued in place so the illusion of stone should hold without any extra gluing.

Things I learned during this process (yay bullet points!):

  • Hot glue is hot. Go figure.
  • Elmer’s glue dries aesthetically better than hot glue. Hot glue is shiny, not matte, this is problematic when imitating stone.
  • I should have used LESS yarn in the bundles that I tied down the center, as the yarn I used was very bulky when all gathered in the back.
  • I should have gathered the hair down one side and then the other BEFORE swirling one side and attaching it to the bun disc in the back. It was difficult to work the second side into the previously glued and dried half done bun and I ended up with WAY too much yarn for the bun in the back.
  • If I’d done the previous bullet point, I could have thinned the yarn out as I worked my way down the sides of the wig OR if I’d done bullet point 3, I might not have had to do even that.
  • I should have found grey yarn to make the beanie out of. I thought the black would be fine if there were gaps in the “hair” yarn, but it’s very visible. Yes, I needed a soft acrylic, but I should have looked harder for something closer to the “hair” color.
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IMG_0777I went on a road trip to see my parents. I took my kids, my homeschool, my yarn, some E2 Happy snacks, and a bunch of good intentions. Well, the trip was great and the kids were very well behaved. I got to see my grandmother who has been in the hospital for some time. I crocheted her a hat that looked fab on her and spent a bunch of time running errands for her. It was good to see her spunk and spark, again.

We had school during the week days and the kids were great considering that it was a modified version of our workboxes. I expected a bit of an issue with Chi, but that didn’t happen. He was very amenable to the change. That is amazing. Chi. Flexible. Chi. Chill in the face of change. CRAZY and so amazing! I’ve said it here before, but homeschooling him has been the best decision I ever made.

I spent some time before my trip looking for quilt designs for a quilt my mom is making. We usually do it like this: I pick a design, find the pattern, choose the fabrics and help cut out the pieces. Mom puts all the squares together and assembles the quilt and does the quilting. She does all the sewing. Due to all the things I was in town to accomplish, that gave me several days to actually do some of the sewing.

Triangles together with thread

Triangles together with thread

It was a sort of newsflash for me. I LOVED it! And this time, I made the quilt design based on a photo I found of a quilt I liked. I took the whole project to a whole different place when picking out the fabrics. So much so, that Mom wasn’t sold on the idea until we started piecing it all together. It’s going to be really fabulous and I’ve discovered that I don’t hate sewing at all, let alone how much I thought I hated it.

Toward the end of the week, I went to watch some basketball in the 2nd and 3rd rounds of the NCAA tournament. College ball is always great and live College Round Ball is always super fun. It’s been a thing I’ve shared with my dad since junior high. There were a couple of downsides. The main one being that Rupp Arena is old and crappy and uncomfortable, but also Dad got sick and missed a couple of games. The b-ball was fun, in the end. I’m glad I went.

Rupp Arena runs Cardinal Red.

Rupp Arena runs Cardinal Red.

So that leaves us with the good intentions. So I did okay in the first few days of the trip. I wasn’t eating entirely vegan and not even close to E2 Happy, but I was making good choices. Choosing the vegetarian option, which almost always includes cheese, and the veg where possible. Admittedly, I didn’t make any special efforts, like ordering things not on the menu and giving special dietary cooking instructions to the waitstaff.

My downfall is, and has ever been, soda. I don’t like artificial sweeteners of any stripe. They are just awful tasting to me. So when I have a soda, I go all out. For some reason, when I’m drinking soda, my inhibitions in other places, dietarily speaking, gets completely shot. It’s hard for me to resist sodas when I’m on a road trip. I don’t know why, but it probably has something to do with rationalizing wanting a caffeine boost, but not wanting coffee in the middle of the day. Perfect recipe for the drinking of sodas. And this road trip was 10-ish hours to my parents’ house one day followed by 6-ish hours to my grandmother’s house the following day. Doubled for the return trips. Lots of driving. Lots of time to convince myself I could have a soda.

So I did.

The rest of the trip/visit followed suit and my good intentions paved my way into food choice hell. But, I’m home now, and I’m recommitted. I want this to work. I want to be healthier. I don’t want to have a heart attack before 40. I don’t want to end up a diabetic because I can’t give up the damn sodas. I’m working hard to not beat myself up over the lapse, and just move forward, one food choice at a time.